What is paroxetine: Side Effects, How to use, Dosage

What is paroxetine: Side Effects, How to use, Dosage

What is paroxetine

Paroxetine is a type of anti-depressant drug that is also known by other trade names such as  Aropax, Paxil, Pexeva, Seroxat, Sereupin and Brisdelle, was first marketed in the U.S. in 1992. Effective for major depression and various anxiety disorders, it quickly gained a sizable share of the antidepressant prescription market.

Paroxetine is used to treat depression, panic attacks, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), anxiety disorders, and post-traumatic stress disorder. It works by helping to restore the balance of a certain natural substance (serotonin) in the brain.

Paroxetine is known as a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI). This medication may improve your mood, sleep, appetite, and energy level and may help restore your interest in daily living. It may decrease fear, anxiety, unwanted thoughts, and the number of panic attacks. It may also reduce the urge to perform repeated tasks (compulsions such as hand-washing, counting, and checking) that interfere with daily living. The Brisdelle brand of paroxetine is used to treat hot flashes related to menopause.

Brisdelle is not for treating any other conditions Paroxetine helps many people recover from depression, and it has fewer unwanted effects than older antidepressants.  It treats depression and other mental illnesses by increasing the amount of serotonin, a natural substance in the brain that helps maintain mental balance.

Paroxetine is available on prescription. It comes as tablets and as a liquid that you swallow.

Please if you have any questions about Paroxetine, you can ask us by commenting below this text, we'll answer you as soon as possible.

How to use Paroxetine?

You can use this medication in different forms as how it suits to you. For example Paroxetine comes as a tablet, a suspension (liquid), a controlled-release (long-acting) tablet, and a capsule to take by mouth. The tablets, suspension, and controlled-release tablets are usually taken once daily in the morning or evening, with or without food. The capsules are usually taken once a day at bedtime with or without food. You may want to take paroxetine with food to prevent stomach upset. Take paroxetine at around the same time every day. Follow the directions on your prescription label carefully, and ask your doctor or pharmacist to explain any part you do not understand. Take paroxetine exactly as directed. Do not take more or less of it or take it more often than prescribed by your doctor.

Shake the liquid well before each use to mix the medication evenly.

Swallow the extended-release and regular tablets whole; do not chew or crush them.

If you are taking paroxetine tablets, suspension, or controlled-release tablets, your doctor may start you on a low dose of paroxetine and gradually increase your dose, not more than once a week.

Paroxetine capsules contain a lower dose of paroxetine than is needed to treat depression and other forms of mental illness. Do not take paroxetine capsules to treat a mental illness. If you think you have depression or another mental illness, talk to your doctor about treatment.

Paroxetine may help control your symptoms but will not cure your condition. It may take several weeks or longer before you feel the full benefit of paroxetine. Continue to take paroxetine even if you feel well. Do not stop taking paroxetine without talking to your doctor. Your doctor may decrease your dose gradually. If you suddenly stop taking paroxetine tablets, suspension, or controlled-release tablets, you may experience withdrawal symptoms such as depression; mood changes; frenzied or abnormally excited mood; irritability; anxiety; confusion; dizziness; headache; tiredness; numbness or tingling in the arms, legs, hands, or feet; unusual dreams; difficulty falling asleep or staying asleep; nausea; or sweating. Tell your doctor if you experience any of these symptoms when your dose of paroxetine is decreased.

Side effects of Paroxetine

As all we know many medications may cause some side effects to the patients that they must pay attention to them and inform the doctor as soon as they appear on them or not they may lead to other serious problems.

Nausea, drowsiness, dizziness, trouble sleeping, loss of appetite, weakness, dry mouth, sweating, blurred vision, and yawning may occur. If any of these effects persist or worsen, tell your doctor or pharmacist promptly.

Remember that your doctor has prescribed this medication because he or she has judged that the benefit to you is greater than the risk of side effects. Many people using this medication do not have serious side effects.

Tell your doctor right away if you have any serious side effects, including: shaking (tremor), restlessness, inability to keep still, decreased interest in sex, changes in sexual ability, numbness/tingling, easy bruising/bleeding, fast/irregular heartbeat, muscle weakness/spasm, seizures.

Get medical help right away if you have any very serious side effects, including: black stools, vomit that looks like coffee grounds, eye pain/swelling/redness, widened pupils, vision changes (such as seeing rainbows around lights at night).

This medication may increase serotonin and rarely cause a very serious condition called serotonin syndrome/toxicity. The risk increases if you are also taking other drugs that increase serotonin, so tell your doctor or pharmacist of all the drugs you take (see Drug Interactions section). Get medical help right away if you develop some of the following symptoms fast heartbeat, hallucinations, loss of coordination, severe dizziness, severe nausea/vomiting/diarrhea, twitching muscles, unexplained fever, unusual agitation/restlessness.

Rarely, males may have a painful or prolonged erection lasting 4 or more hours. If this occurs, stop using this drug and get medical help right away, or permanent problems could occur.

A very serious allergic reaction to this drug is rare. However, get medical help right away if you notice any symptoms of a serious allergic reaction, including: rash, itching/swelling (especially of the face/tongue/throat), severe dizziness, trouble breathing.

This is not a complete list of possible side effects. If you notice other effects not listed above, contact your doctor or pharmacist.  You shouldn't drive, use heavy machinery, or do other activities for which you need to be alert until you know how this drug affects you.

Paroxetine dosing information

Usual Adult dose of Paroxetine for Depression:

Immediate-release tablets and suspension:

Initial dose: 20 mg orally once a day

Maintenance dose: 20 to 50 mg orally once a day

Maximum dose: 50 mg orally once a day

Controlled-release tablets:

Initial dose: 25 mg orally once a day

Maintenance dose: 25 to 62.5 mg orally once a day

Maximum dose: 62.5 mg orally once a day

Duration: Acute episodes of major depressive disorder require several months or longer of sustained pharmacologic therapy; systemic evaluation has shown that efficacy was maintained for up to one year.

Paroxetine

Drugs may interact with Paroxetine

Drug interactions may change how your medications work or increase your risk for serious side effects. This document does not contain all possible drug interactions. Keep a list of all the products you use (including prescription/nonprescription drugs and herbal products) and share it with your doctor and pharmacist. Do not start, stop, or change the dosage of any medicines without your doctor's approval.

Some products that may interact with this drug include: thioridazine, other drugs that can cause bleeding/bruising (including antiplatelet drugs such as clopidogrel, NSAIDs such as ibuprofen, "blood thinners" such as warfarin).

Aspirin can increase the risk of bleeding when used with this medication. However, if your doctor has directed you to take low-dose aspirin for heart attack or stroke prevention (usually at dosages of 81-325 milligrams a day), you should continue taking it unless your doctor instructs you otherwise. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for more details.

This medication can slow down the removal of other medications from your body, which may affect how they work. Examples of affected drugs include atomoxetine, phenothiazines, pimozide, risperidone, tamoxifen, tetrabenazine, antiarrhythmics such as propafenone/flecainide, TCA antidepressants such as desipramine/amitriptyline, among others.

Taking MAO inhibitors with this medication may cause a serious (possibly fatal) drug interaction. Avoid taking MAO inhibitors (isocarboxazid, linezolid, methylene blue, moclobemide, phenelzine, procarbazine, rasagiline, safinamide, selegiline, tranylcypromine) during treatment with this medication. Most MAO inhibitors should also not be taken for two weeks before and after treatment with this medication. Ask your doctor when to start or stop taking this medication.

The risk of serotonin syndrome/toxicity increases if you are also taking other drugs that increase serotonin. Examples include street drugs such as MDMA/"ecstasy," St. John's wort, certain antidepressants (including other SSRIs such as citalopram/fluoxetine, SNRIs such as duloxetine/venlafaxine), tryptophan, among others. The risk of serotonin syndrome/toxicity may be more likely when you start or increase the dose of these drugs.

Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are taking other products that cause drowsiness including alcohol, marijuana, antihistamines (such as cetirizine, diphenhydramine), drugs for sleep or anxiety (such as alprazolam, diazepam, zolpidem), muscle relaxants, and narcotic pain relievers (such as codeine).

Check the labels on all your medicines (such as allergy or cough-and-cold products) because they may contain ingredients that cause drowsiness. Ask your pharmacist about using those products safely.

This medication may interfere with certain medical/laboratory tests (including brain scan for Parkinson's disease), possibly causing false test results. Make sure laboratory personnel and all your doctors know you use this drug.

Warnings of Paroxetine

This drug has a black box warning. This is the most serious warning from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). A black box warning alerts doctors and patients about drug effects that may be dangerous.

Antidepressant medications such as paroxetine may increase suicidal thoughts and behaviors, especially within the first few months of treatment or when your dose is changed. This risk is higher in children, teenagers, and young adults. You, family members, caregivers, and your doctor should pay attention to any unusual changes in your mood, behaviors, thoughts, or feelings.

Serotonin syndrome warning: This drug can cause a potentially life-threatening condition called serotonin syndrome. It can be caused by this drug alone or with the use of other medications that have similar effects. Symptoms of serotonin syndrome can include agitation, hallucinations, confusion, trouble thinking, coma, coordination problems, and muscle twitching (overactive reflexes).

Worsened depression warning: Paroxetine may worsen your depression. If you experience any unusual changes in behavior, especially during the first few months of treatment or when your dose changes, call your doctor. These can include anxiety, restlessness, panic attacks, sleeplessness, irritability, aggressiveness, acting on dangerous impulses, attempts to commit suicide, and extreme mood swings.

Stopping treatment warning: If you're stopping treatment with this drug, it should be done gradually and with your doctor's guidance. Don't stop taking this drug abruptly. Withdrawal symptoms can occur when this drug is stopped too quickly. Symptoms of withdrawal include anxiety, irritability, restlessness, and changes in sleep habits, headache, sweating, nausea, dizziness, shaking, and confusion. You should be monitored for these symptoms when stopping treatment with paroxetine.

Paroxetine

Please if you have any questions about Paroxetine, you can ask us by commenting below this text, we'll answer you as soon as possible.

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