What is Augmentin: How To Use, Dosage, Side Effects, Warnings

What is Augmentin: How To Use, Dosage, Side Effects, Warnings

What is Augmentin

Augmentin is an antibiotic drug that contains two drugs amoxicillin and clavulanic potassium.  The generic name of Augmentin is amoxicillin/clavulanate potassium. This combination makes Augmentin work against more types of bacteria than antibiotics that contain amoxicillin alone. Clavulanate potassium is a beta-lactamase inhibitor that helps prevent certain bacteria from becoming resistant to amoxicillin. Amoxicillin is an antibiotic in group of penicillin and fights bacteria in the body.

Augmentin is used to treat many different infections caused by bacteria, including sinusitis, pneumonia, ear infections, bronchitis, urinary tract infections, and infections of the skin. This antibiotic treats only bacterial infections. It will not work for viral infections (such as common cold, flu).

 

 

Please if you have any questions about Augmentin, you can contact us in comments and take our free recommendations.

 

 

How to use Augmentin

Augmentin usually is prescribed for every 12 hours. Take this medication by mouth with a meal or snack. Take this drug at evenly spaced intervals. Continue to take this medication until the full prescribed amount is finished even if symptoms disappear after a few days. Do not crush or chew the extended-release tablet. The chewable tablet must be chewed before you swallow it. Shake the liquid medicine well just before you measure a dose Sudden Stopping of the medication too early may allow bacteria to continue to grow, which may result in a relapse of the infection.

 

 

Dosage of Augmentin

 

For urinary tract infections

•           Typical dosage for mild-to-moderate infections: One 500-mg tablet every 12 hours, or one 250-mg tablet every 8 hours.

•           Typical dosage for severe infections: One 875-mg tablet every 12 hours, or one 500-mg tablet every 8 hours.

•           Treatment length: Usually three to seven days.

For sinus infection

•           Typical dosage: One 875-mg tablet every 12 hours, or one 500-mg tablet every 8 hours.

•           Treatment length: Usually five to seven days.

Extended-release tablets: typical dosage is two tablets every 12 hours for 10 days.

 For skin infections such as impetigo

•           Typical dosage: One 500-mg or 875-mg tablet every 12 hours, or one 250-mg or 500-mg tablet every 8 hours.

•           Treatment length: Usually seven days.

For ear infections

•           Typical dosage: One 875-mg tablet every 12 hours, or one 500-mg tablet every 8 hours.

•           Treatment length: Usually 10 days.

For respiratory infections such as pneumonia

•           Typical dosage: One 875-mg tablet every 12 hours, or one 500-mg tablet every 8 hours for 7 to 10 days.

Extended-release tablets: Typical dosage is two tablets every 12 hours for 7 to 10 days.

Liquid Suspension for adults

The liquid suspension form commonly is used instead of the tablet for adults who have trouble swallowing pills, the suspension to use and the amount to take based on your doctor’s prescription.

Liquid Suspension for children

The liquid suspension form is most of the times used for children. The dosage depends on the condition being treated, its severity, and the age or weight of the child.

For infants younger than 3 months old

•           Typical dosage: 30 mg/kg/day (based on the amoxicillin component of Augmentin). This amount is divided and given every 12 hours.

•           Typical form used: The 125-mg/5-mL suspension.

For children 3 months of age and older who weigh less than 40 kg

For less severe infections:

Typical dosage: 25 mg/kg/day (based on the amoxicillin component of Augmentin), using the 200-mg/5-mL or 400-mg/5-mL suspension. This amount is divided and given every 12 hours.

Alternative dosage: 20 mg/kg/day (based on the amoxicillin component of Augmentin), using the 125-mg/5-mL or 250-mg/5-mL suspension. This amount is divided and given every eight hours.

For more severe infections or ear infections, sinus infections, or respiratory infections:

Typical dosage: 45 mg/kg/day (based on the amoxicillin component of Augmentin), using the 200-mg/5-mL or 400-mg/5-mL suspension. This amount is divided and given every 12 hours.

Alternative dosage: 40 mg/kg/day (based on the amoxicillin component of Augmentin), using the 125-mg/5-mL or 250-mg/5-mL suspension. This amount is divided and given every eight hours.

For children who weigh 40 kg or more: the adult dosage can be used.

Augmentin may not be safe for those who have:

•           liver disease (hepatitis or jaundice);

•           kidney disease

•           Mononucleosis.

 

 

Augmentin

Please if you have any questions about Augmentin, you can contact us in comments and take our free recommendations.

 

 

Drugs that may interact with Augmentin

•           hormonal birth control drugs

•           Methotrexate.

•           Theracys (BCG live intravesical)

•           Vivotif (typhoid vaccine live oral).

•           vitamins and other dietary supplements (nutritional shakes, protein powders, etc)

•           Exenatide (Byetta, Bydureon)

•           Chloroquine (Aralen)

•           Methotrexate (Rheumatrex, Trexall)

•           Magnesium citrate (Citroma) .

•           herbal remedies,

•           Illegal and recreational drugs.

•           Warfarin (Coumadin, Jantoven)

•           Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), such as like omeprazole (Prilosec), esomeprazole (Nexium), rabeprazole (Aciphex), and dexlansoprazole (Dexilant)

•           Tetracycline antibiotics, such as tetracycline or doxycycline (Vibramycin)

•           Tramadol (Ultram, Ultracet)

•           Mycophenolate mofetil (Cellcept)

•           Bupropion (Aplenzin, Contrave, Forfivo XL, Wellbutrin, Zyban)

 

 

 

Side effects of Augmentin

 

These side effects are written by priority wich are taken from www.drugs.com

•           Hives or welts

•           itching

•           itching of the vagina or genital area

•           pain during sexual intercourse

•           redness of the skin

•           skin rash

•           thick, white vaginal discharge with no odor or with a mild odor

•           Bloody or cloudy urine

•           fever

•           greatly decreased frequency of urination or amount of urine

•           seizures

•           swelling of the feet or lower legs

•           Abdominal or stomach cramps or tenderness

•           back, leg, or stomach pains

•           black, hairy tongue

•           black, tarry stools

•           bleeding gums

•           blistering, peeling, or loosening of the skin

•           bloating

•           blood in the stools

•           bloody nose

•           chest pain

•           chills

•           clay-colored stools

•           cough or hoarseness

•           cracks in the skin

•           dark urine

•           diarrhea

•           diarrhea, watery and severe, which may also be bloody

•           difficulty with breathing

•           difficulty with moving

•           difficulty with swallowing

•           dizziness

•           fast heartbeat

•           fever with or without chills

•           general body swelling

•           general feeling of tiredness or weakness

•           headache

•           heavier menstrual periods

•           increased thirst

•           joint or muscle pain

•           large, hive-like swelling on the face, eyelids, lips, tongue, throat, hands, legs, feet, or sex organs

•           light-colored stools

•           loss of appetite

•           loss of heat from the body

•           lower back or side pain

•           muscle stiffness

•           nausea or vomiting

•           pain

•           pain, swelling, or redness in the joints

•           painful or difficult urination

•           pale skin

•           pinpoint red spots on the skin

•           puffiness or swelling of the eyelids or around the eyes, face, lips, or tongue

•           rash

•           red skin lesions, often with a purple center

•           red, irritated eyes

•           red, swollen skin

•           scaly skin

•           sore throat

•           sores, ulcers, or white spots on the lips or in the mouth

•           swollen glands

•           tightness in the chest

•           troubled breathing with exertion

•           unpleasant breath odor

•           unusual bleeding or bruising

•           unusual tiredness or weakness

•           unusual weight loss

•           upper right abdominal or stomach pain

•           vomiting of blood

•           white patches in the mouth or throat or on the tongue

•           white patches with diaper rash

•           yellow eyes or skin

 

 

Warning of Augmentin

Avoid taking Augmentin together with or just after eating a high-fat meal.

Augmentin can cause unusual results with certain lab tests for glucose (sugar) in the urine. Tell any doctor who treats you that you are using Augmentin.

Do not give Augmentin to a child without medical advice.

Augmentin can cause a severe form of diarrhea called Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea (CDAD). It's marked by loose, watery stool with an unusually foul smell.

This medication has been prescribed for your current condition only. Do not use it later for another infection unless your doctor tells you to

What happens if overdose Augmentin

Overdose of Augmentin can cause nausea, vomiting, stomach pain, diarrhea, skin rash, drowsiness, hyperactivity, and decreased urination.

 

 

Augmentin

Please if you have any questions about Augmentin, you can contact us in comments and take our free recommendations.

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