Anxiety in children: What is Anxiety, How anxiety affects children

Anxiety in children: What is Anxiety, How anxiety affects children

Anxiety in children

Certain fears, anxieties and anxieties are common among children and adolescents. As children grow and learn about the world around them, they begin to create their own thoughts and feelings about potential dangers and stressors. While many young children are afraid of darkness, dogs and monsters (several names), older children can express concern about death, loss, and personal security. Children tend to be different for different ages. Many of these concerns are a natural part of growth. It is also common for preschool children to create special fears or fears. Common fears in early childhood include animals, insects, storms, altitudes, water, blood and darkness. These fears are usually gradually resolved. Some anxiety in children and adolescents is a completely normal part of progress. However, some children feel a lot of anxiety and concern. Some symptoms of panic attacks occur. Some are very anxious with the factors and symptoms they are trying to engage in everyday activities. Childhood anxiety can negatively affect school life, family relationships, peer relationships, and even child's physical health.

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What is anxiety?

Anxiety is a common and natural experience that is felt by many people regardless of age. Anxiety is a normal response when faced with something that is threatening or dangerous, embarrassing or stressful because it prepares us to manage the situation.

For children and young people there are common fears that are often associated with age. For example, infants develop fears of separating from their parents. Fears of insects and animals are often seen in young children, and most children are scared of the dark or will imagine that there are monsters under the bed. Teenagers also have many anxieties including worrying about fitting in and being judged by other people. Performance anxiety is common amongst children and young people competing for high levels of sporting or academic excellence.

Anxiety is a normal and natural experience that is felt by many people regardless of age. Anxiety is a normal response when faced with something that is threatening or dangerous, embarrassing or stressful because it prepares us to manage the situation.

There is common fear for children that sometimes associated with age. For example, babies are afraid of separating from their parents. Fear of insects and animals is often seen in young children, and most children are afraid of darkness, or they think they are monsters under the bed. Adolescents also have a lot of concerns, including concern about the compatibility and judgment of others. Functional anxiety is common among children and adolescents who compete at high levels of sports and education.

What are the different types of anxiety disorders?

Generalized Anxiety Disorder

If your child has generalized anxiety disorder, or (GAD), he or she will worry too much about things like grades, family issues, peer relationships, and doing exercise. Children with GAD tend to be very hard on themselves and strive for perfection. They may also seek constant approval or reassurance from others.

Panic Disorder

Panic disorder is diagnosed if your child experiences at least two unpleasant or anxiety attacks - that is, suddenly and for no reason - looking for at least one month of worrying about another attack, loss of control or "going crazy."

Separation Anxiety Disorder

Many children experience separation anxiety between 18 months and three years of age, when a parent comes out or disappears from the room, the child feels anxious. Usually children can be disturbed by these feelings.

It’s also common for your child to cry when first being left at daycare or pre-school, and crying usually subsides after becoming engaged in the new environment.

If your child is slightly older and unable to leave you or another family member, or takes longer to calm down after you leave than other children, then the problem could be separation anxiety disorder, which affects 4 percent of children. This disorder is most common in kids ages seven to nine.

When separation anxiety disorder occurs, a child has excessive anxiety at home or when separated from parents or caregivers. Extreme homesickness and feelings of misery at not being with loved ones are common.

Other symptoms include refusing to go to school, camp, or a sleepover, and demanding that someone stay with them at bedtime. Children with separation anxiety commonly worry about bad things happening to their parents or caregivers or may have a vague sense of something terrible occurring while they are apart.

Social Anxiety Disorder

Social anxiety disorder, or social phobia, is characterized by an intense fear of social and performance situations and activities such as being called on in class or starting a conversation with a peer.  This can significantly impair your child’s school performance and attendance, as well as his or her ability to socialize with peers and develop and maintain relationships.

Selective Mutism

Children who refuse to speak in situations where talking is expected or necessary, to the extent that their refusal interferes with school and making friends, may suffer from selective mutism.

Children suffering from selective mutism may stand motionless and expressionless, turn their heads, chew or twirl hair, avoid eye contact, or withdraw into a corner to avoid talking.

These children can be very talkative and display normal behaviors at home or in another place where they feel comfortable. Parents are sometimes surprised to learn from a teacher that their child refuses to speak at school.

The average age of diagnosis is around 5 years old, or around the time a child enters school.

Specific Phobias

A particular phobia is the intense, irrational fear of a specific object such as a dog or a condition like flight. Common childhood fears include animals, storms, heights, water, blood, darkness and medical methods.

Children will avoid situations or things that they fear, or endure them with anxious feelings, which can manifest as crying, tantrums, clinging, avoidance, headaches, and stomachaches. Unlike adults, they do not usually recognize that their fear is irrational.

Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are closely related to anxiety disorders, which some may experience at the same time, along with depression.

OCD and PTSD are highly associated with anxiety disorders, some of which may be associated with depression.

Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD)

OCD is characterized by unwanted and intrusive thoughts (obsessions) Most children with OCD are diagnosed around age 10, although the disorder can strike children as young as two or three. Boys are more likely to develop OCD before puberty, while girls tend to develop it during adolescence.

OCD is compelled by unwanted and intrusive thoughts (obsession) and feeling compelled to repeatedly perform rituals and routines (compulsions) to try and ease anxiety. Most children with OCD are diagnosed around age 10, although the disorder can affect children at two or three years of age. Boys are more likely to grow OCD before puberty, while girls tend to grow during adolescence.

Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)

Children with posttraumatic stress disorder, or PTSD, may have intense fear and anxiety, become emotionally numb

Children with posttraumatic stress disorder or PTSD may have severe anxiety and fear after experiencing or easily irritable, or avoid places, people, or activities after experiencing or witnessing a traumatic or life-threatening event.

hears about a traumatic event will develop PTSD. It is normal to be fearful, sad, or apprehensive after such events, and many children will recover from these feelings in a short time.

Children most at risk for PTSD are those who directly witnessed a traumatic event, who suffered directly (such as injury or the death of a parent), had mental health problems before the event, and who lack a strong support network. Violence at home also increases a child’s risk of developing PTSD after a traumatic event.

Celax and Citalopram are two medicines that can be effective for this problem.

Fearful and anxious behaviors are common in children - especially when they are in new situations and experiences. Most children learn to deal with different fears and concerns

However, they may need some extra support when:

they feel anxious more than other children of a similar age

anxiety stops them participating in activities at school or socially

anxiety interferes with their ability to do things that other children their age can do

their fears and worries seem out of proportion to the issues in their life.

Anxiety in children

Please if you have any questions about Anxiety in children, you can ask us by commenting below this text, we'll answer you as soon as possible.

How anxiety affects children

Anxiety can have an effect on their thinking. They perceive the fear or danger they’re worried about to be much greater than it actually is. Thinking about the situation makes them more worried and tense.

Anxiety can have an effect on children's thinking as well as their feeling. They understand the fear or danger that they are concerned about. Thinking about the situation makes them more concerned.

Kids experiencing anxiety may come up with their own strategies to try and manage distressing situations. This often involves trying to avoid the situation or having a parent or other adult deal with it for them.

Anxiety can also result in physical symptoms such as sleeplessness, diarrhea, stomach aches and headaches (sometimes referred to as somatic complaints). Other symptoms may include irritability, dif´Čüculty concentrating and tiredness.

What are the signs of anxiety in children?

When young children feel anxious, they cannot always understand or express what they are feeling. You may notice that they:

become irritable, tearful or clingy

have difficulty sleeping

wake in the night

start wetting the bed

have bad dreams

In older children you may notice that they:

lack the confidence to try new things or seem unable to face simple, everyday challenges

find it hard to concentrate

have problems with sleeping or eating

are prone to angry outbursts

have negative thoughts going round and round their head, or keep thinking that bad things are going to happen

start avoiding everyday activities, such as seeing friends, going out in public or attending school

How to help your anxious child?

If a child is experiencing anxiety, there is plenty parents and cares can do to help.

First and foremost, it's important to talk to your child about their anxiety or worries. Reassure them and show them you understand how they feel.

If your child is old enough, it may help to explain what anxiety is and the physical effects it has on our bodies. It may be helpful to describe anxiety as being like a wave that builds up and then ebbs away again.

As you gained from this article Specific fears, worries, and anxious thoughts are common among children and adolescents and many of these worries are a normal part of growing up.

Some anxiety among children and adolescents is a perfectly normal part of development. Some children, however, experience an overwhelming sense of anxiety and dread. Some experience symptoms of panic attacks. Some become so preoccupied with their triggers and symptoms that they struggle to attend to normal daily activities. Childhood anxiety can negatively impact life in school, family relationships, peer relationships, and even the physical health of the child. . Some anxiety among children and adolescents is a perfectly normal part of development. Here in this article we informed you that Some children, however, experience an overwhelming sense of anxiety and dread. Some experience symptoms of panic attacks. Some become so preoccupied with their triggers and symptoms that they struggle to attend to normal daily activities. Childhood anxiety can negatively impact life in school, family relationships, peer relationships, and even the physical health of the child.

Anxiety in children

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